The Hiding Place Corrie Ten Boom

May 13, 2011

The hiding Place by Corrie Ten Boom on film

Filed under: Uncategorized — by thehidingplacecorrietenboom @ 8:29 am

Corrie ten Boom was born on April 15, 1892 around Haarlem in the Netherlands. She was the youngest of four children. Her mother died of a stroke at the age of 63. Her father, Casper ten Boom, was a watch repairman.

During the Second World War, the ten Boom home became a refuge and the hiding place for fugitives and those hunted by the Nazis. By protecting these people, Casper and his daughters, Corrie Ten Boom and Betsie, risked their lives. Arrested and put into a concentration camp themselves, the ten Boom family members clung to their faith in Christ during their ordeal.

The true story of the family’s plight is told in The Hiding Place, the most popular film produced by World Wide Pictures—the motion-picture ministry of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association.

Billy  Graham talked about Corrie and the film: “Corrie is one of the great Christian heroines of the century. We met her in Switzerland, and her story made such an impression on Ruth that she recommended it to writers John and Elizabeth Sherrill. They jumped at it; and the book and film that followed brought home the horror of those days and the triumph of Christ’s love in the midst of virulent hatred.”

At a reception later that evening, Corrie ten Boom spoke in her distinctive Dutch accent: “People asked me tonight, ‘What did you feel about this [tear-gas] bomb that was falling?’ I was touched. I was sad. Do you know why? Not only because there was in some way disappointment for people who had hoped to see the film but because on that bomb was the Hakenkreuz, the [Nazi] swastika.

“What we have to do,” said Corrie, “is love these people who hate us—love them, pray for them. These people are wounded people who have hate in their hearts. They need forgiveness. They need the Lord. . . . That is the answer we must give.”

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